He puna mātauranga rānei te māwhaiwhai? The house of the spider, a spring of knowledge or not?

Kia Niwha Leader Fellow
DR ROSE COLLIS

Rose Collis v2
Principal Investigator
Dr Rose Collis
AgResearch
Public Contact
Te Niwha
teniwhacomms@otago.ac.nz
Project Timeframe/Status
-
In Process

Whakarāpopoto Rangahau Summary of Research

Priority Theme: Surveillance
Discipline: Microbiology, Genomics, Antimicrobial Resistance

This research project will provide insights into antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in New Zealand’s environment and develop strategies to enhance surveillance, strengthen connections between scientific research and community groups, and contribute to better strategies for mitigating the transmission of AMR.

Dr Rose Collis will compare the potential of māwhaiwhai (spider webs) and freshwater for monitoring biodiversity and AMR. She will build relationships with mana whenua and community groups to interweave mātauranga Māori and western science. The project will focus on collecting water samples and māwhaiwhai from sites in the Tararua district, representing sites with contrasting land-uses such as urban, agricultural, and natural areas.

DNA will be extracted from the environmental samples and analysed using Nanopore long-read metagenomic sequencing to examine the microbial composition, detect pathogens, and identify AMR genes. Māwhaiwhai and freshwater samples will also be sent to Wilderlab for environmental DNA analysis to monitor the biodiversity at the sites and assess ecosystem health.

He Kōtaha Kairangahau Researcher Profile

Dr Rose Collis
Principal Investigator
AgResearch

Dr Rose Collis is a post-doctoral researcher at AgResearch in the Food System Integrity Team and based at the Hopkirk Research Institute, Palmerston North. Raised on a dairy farm in Hukanui, Eketahuna, Dr Collis completed her PhD at Massey University, focusing on the prevalence and distribution of antimicrobial resistance determinants on New Zealand dairy farms. She currently partners with community groups, farmers, mana whenua and various local and government stakeholders in collaborations which aim to understand the impact of various land-use activities on water quality. Here she applies different genomics methods to assess levels of antimicrobial resistance and waterborne pathogens, informing local communities of potential public health risk and opportunities for improved farm systems and catchment biodiversity. Dr Collis’ key capabilities extend from microbiology, genomic epidemiology, and metagenomics through to outreach with local catchment communities and school kids.

Project Status

In Process

 

Media Contact 

Te Niwha
teniwhacomms@otago.ac.nz